Guest

Ireland is ready for a conversation about values

This is a guest post by Rachel Mullen, Coordinator of the Equality and Rights Alliance and a point of contact for Common Cause in Ireland.

We have come through a difficult period of austerity, the impact of which has given rise to diminished public services, a homeless crisis, a significant increase in child poverty and growing hostility to migrants, to name but a few key issues. The community and voluntary sector has taken a battering, with many organisations under increased pressure to deliver frontline services to greater numbers and with fewer resources.

Pic for Mullen blog

Adapted from image by Saxarocks, Flickr Creative Commons – https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/

GuestIreland is ready for a conversation about values
read more

Action Learning Programme in Scotland recognised with UNESCO award

This post was written by Osbert Lancaster.

A group of us working on Common Cause in Scotland developed the Communities with a Common Cause Action Learning Programme to pilot an approach to putting Common Cause into practice that could be replicated more widely. The programme had excellent feedback from participants and was recognised with a UNESCO Outstanding Flagship Project Award. The judging panel were particularly impressed by the innovative nature of the project and its contribution to pushing forward the field of Education for Sustainable Development.

How it worked

Sixteen people participated in the programme, drawn from government agencies, NGOs and community groups engaging communities with the environment. Participants were recruited in pairs from each of the eight organisations and were selected for the influence they could bring to bear on their own organisation and their sector. The programme ran from September 2013 to February 2014 with one workshop per month introducing a range of concepts, tools and approaches that can be used to create a values-based approach.
Participants undertook activities between each workshop to put learning into practice and prepare for the next workshop, and were supported by a mentor.

The programme was evaluated using a range of methods including in depth semi-structured interviews with participants.

Alp scotland 1

Discussions at the Common Cause ALP in Scotland

GuestAction Learning Programme in Scotland recognised with UNESCO award
read more

Nudging all over the world: behaviour change & public policy

Reflections on the scale of impact of the new behavioural sciences on public policy-making

This is a guest post from Professor Mark Whitehead of Aberystwyth University.

With all of the contemporary debate and discussion about nudge-type policies it can be difficult to assess the scale of the impacts that the ‘new’ behavioural sciences (including behavioural economics, behavioural psychology and even neuroscience) are actually having on public policy. At one level, there is a tendency to dismiss nudge-inspired initiatives as being relatively marginal within the broader universe of politics and public policy-making. But such dismissive perspectives are rarely based on careful analyses of actually exiting policies. There are, of course, many different ways in which you can begin to assess the scale of the impacts of any policy regime. Scales of impact can relate to the relative number of policies that have been shaped by new insights; or the actual affects that related policies have on people’s everyday lives. Scales of impact can also relate to the geographical prevalence of the policies under consideration. In a recent report entitled Nudging all Over the World: Assessing the Global Impact of the Behavioural Sciences on Public Policy we outline the scale of the geographical spread of nudge-type policies.

The global spread of nudge-type policies (states shaded blue have engaged in the central orchestration of nudge-types policies; those shaded red show evidence of some form of nudge-type policy being applied in their territory)

The global spread of nudge-type policies (states shaded blue have engaged in the central orchestration of nudge-types policies; those shaded red show evidence of some form of nudge-type policy being applied in their territory)

GuestNudging all over the world: behaviour change & public policy
read more

Food Values: a new project with Organic Centre Wales

This is a guest blog from Jane Powell, originally posted here.

What does food mean to us? Is it fuel for the engine, a fashion item, an export commodity, a sensual temptation, a vehicle for culture and celebration, a badge of religious and political identity, or a vital connection with the natural world? It can be all of these things and more, and the stories we tell about food will have consequences for what we choose to eat, and ultimately the food systems that we end up with.

Carrot circumplex

GuestFood Values: a new project with Organic Centre Wales
read more

From single issues towards systemic change: Tearfund’s ‘Project Doughnut’

This blog was written by Lara Kirch and Micha Narberhaus at Smart CSOs.

As we have experienced in the Smart CSOs community over the last two years, changing an organisation to work on system change is far from an easy task. Most civil society organisations are deeply entrenched in the current system. We might irritate partners and constituencies if we don’t fulfil their expectations and we have a reputation and trust to lose. Most available funding schemes are far from supporting the type of uncertain work needed for long-term system change. But the most difficult part is to change the organisation’s culture, its structure and way of doing things. It requires a change in mindsets and developing the right capacities.

Maybe it is not a surprise that recently some church and faith-based organisations have been among the most progressive pioneers in starting to promote and communicate an alternative vision for a socially and environmentally sustainable global society that is based on sufficiency, solidarity and community. They are grounded on exactly these values.

The advocacy department of Tearfund, a UK Christian relief and development agency founded in 1968, has recently embarked on a change process aimed at aligning its strategic focus and internal structures with a vision of an economy that works for people and the planet. Sarah Anthony and Tom Baker from Tearfund’s advocacy team have told us how they have approached this challenge and what they have learned so far.

GuestFrom single issues towards systemic change: Tearfund’s ‘Project Doughnut’
read more

The Real Value of Water

The Common Cause for Nature report highlights the importance of the conservation sector engaging with other actors with a firm understanding of the values implications of that engagement. In this guest post, Rob Cunningham head of Water Policy at the RSPB discusses these issues in regard to the water industry.

When I mentioned the work of Common Cause at a recent water industry conference I felt a momentary pang of guilt – should I really be pointing these servants of mammon to such valuable insights into our motivations and psyche? What if they use it against us?

And there are reasons to be worried. Recent reports and headlines have shed light on dubious tax arrangements, huge payouts and opaque foreign ownership. Such behaviour draws uncomfortable comparison with Google, Amazon and Starbucks.

But there is one fundamental difference.

GuestThe Real Value of Water
read more

Four reasons why consumers will never solve climate change

Appleworship

Last week’s publication of the first instalment of the new IPCC report is a vital moment to be seized upon. It presents a fresh chance to put the issue of climate change back where it should be as one of the most fundamental modern global challenges: at the top of the political and social agenda.  As has happened before, it will provoke a round of inquiry into why nothing (or at least nothing commensurate with the scale of the problem) has been done, and why we continue to run still further off the edge of a very high cliff.

In the recent past, the primary revision to the strategy of environmentalists has been to say we need to change the story.  We have talked too much doom and gloom, and we need to paint a positive vision to motivate Consumers to change the world.

This change of story has moved things on a little (as per my previous post on Martin Luther King), but we now need to take the next step.  The story is better; we have improved WHAT is said.  Now we need to change the audience; WHO we are talking to.

We have to face the fact that Consumers will never solve climate change.  Only Citizens can do it.

Here are the four big reasons:

GuestFour reasons why consumers will never solve climate change
read more

The Art of Life: how arts and culture affect our values

“We need new ideas, we need new ways of doing things and we need a whole new way of approaching each other with much more empathy and understanding. This means that the rest of society really needs to focus on the world of art and culture as a vital source for not only solutions, but also ways of finding solutions… and a whole knew concept of what a valuable life really means.” – Uffe Elbaek, former Danish Minister of Culture

Last year the Future Generation Art Prize was created to help younger artists participate in the cultural development of societies in global transition. On launching the Prize, founder Victor Pinchuk said, “I believe artists can show our world of tomorrow better than politicians and analysts”.

This month a group of philanthropists working to promote social justice and peace met with artists to work on their relationship with art and culture.

Next week an art school will open in East London with a new model as both a school and communal space emphasising cooperation and experimentation. It is being set up to facilitate the sharing of knowledge and skills between artists, local residents and neighbourhood organisations.

These few examples go beyond art for art’s sake, they make art for our sake. More and more people are coming to the realisation that we are reaching the limits of our planet’s capacity to support us. Our wellbeing is declining and inequality is rising, which is fuelling conflict, mass migration, poverty and many other social problems. We need to act fast if we are to find new economic and social paradigms that recognise the limits of our finite planet and enable all people to flourish.

Can we transition the values of our society and economy within a generation? Well we need to give it our best shot, armed with insight into what makes a real difference. Our customs, behaviors, and values are byproducts of our culture. No one is born with greed, prejudice, bigotry and hatred; these are all learned behaviours. We need to find more and better ways to learn from and understand each other, disrupt vested interests and imagine and create more sustainable ways of living.

Art and culture’s core practice is one of the most participative, dynamic and social forms of human behaviour. It has the capacity to trigger reflection, generate empathy, create dialogue and foster new ideas and relationships and offers a powerful and democratic way of expressing, sharing and shaping values. It can help us build new capabilities and understand how to imagine and rehearse a different way of being and relating. It can enable us to design useful and meaningful things and is increasingly the basis of livelihoods and enterprises that are motivated by much more than profit.

But to fully release this potential, we need to deepen our understanding of how arts impact on our values and rethink how and why we value art. Our values represent our guiding principles, our broadest motivations, influencing the attitudes we hold and how we act. They shape the way we look at and understand the world and the mental structures that order our ideas. They are the frame through which we construct the stories that we tell ourselves and others about what is important.

In The Art of Life, Tim Kasser, professor of psychology and co-author of Common Cause; The Case for Working with our Cultural Values, sets out the evidence base for the shaping of values and explores the potential of engagement with art and culture to affect our:

  • self-acceptance,
  • affiliation, and
  • community feeling,

As well as values that are known to affect higher levels of personal, social, and ecological well-being such as:

  • freedom,
  • creativity,
  • self-respect,
  • equality and
  • unity with nature.

A number of people have offered their responses to the ideas that Tim explores in his article, including an emergent artist, a playwright, a campaigner, a designer, a director of a cultural organisation, and two academics from different disciplines. Their generous contributions and critique are fascinating and sometimes fierce.

This report is the beginning of a dialogue about how art and culture impact on our values, what that might look like in practice, and how we might foster new collaborations between artists and cultural institutions and the third sector to create new ideas for development.

This is a dialogue that needs lots of voices, and we’d love to hear from anyone who’d like to be involved.

This is a guest post by Shelagh Wright of Mission Models Money. You can download the report below, or contact her at: contact@missionmodelsmoney.org.uk

GuestThe Art of Life: how arts and culture affect our values
read more

People for Ecosystem Services: Rethinking market solutions for sustainable farming practice

I have just been reading Jay Griffith’s latest book ‘Kith’, in which she urges us not to lose sight of our relationship with nature and our connectedness with the earth:

“Land can make someone who they are, can create their psyche, giving them fragments of themselves… shatter the relation to the land and you can shatter personalities”

Common Cause for Nature (CCfN) brings the same plea centre stage as a means to guide the conservation sector in their task of championing, protecting and restoring the environment that is our home. Demonstrating the importance of nurturing intrinsic values, which foster care for others of every species, ‘Common Cause…’ provides an important caution against the ever increasing reliance we now place in economic value and market solutions.

GuestPeople for Ecosystem Services: Rethinking market solutions for sustainable farming practice
read more

Common Cause for Nature: A call to collaborate

This is a guest post by Jon Alexander of the National Trust.

The lessons for the conservation movement held within Common Cause for Nature are deep and many. But I would argue the most important is the simplest of all, and comes before you get beyond the cover. It is the title – Common Cause for Nature. This is a call to arms to all of us who work in this space not just to work and campaign separately on our own specific ‘bits’, but far more importantly, to get beyond those bits and work together to create a proactive, persuasive, powerful whole.

GuestCommon Cause for Nature: A call to collaborate
read more