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Leave Our Kids Alone

Yesterday saw the launch of the campaign Leave Our Kids Alone, with a letter in The Telegraph, and articles in the Daily Mail and The Guardian. This campaign grapples with what must surely be one of the most important common causes around which third sector organisations, irrespective of the issues upon which they work, should be galvanised: the problem of advertising aimed at our children. Read more

Rebuilding Optimism of Will

Che Guevara said that “the true revolutionary is guided by strong feelings of love”. But not just any love, the love of humanity that transcends the day to day love of individuals (our family for example).1 In a way its a shame that the actual content of this paragraph from Che has been bastardised to be about some nebulous love that drives revolutionaries. Instead what Che was talking about was a very real dilemma. How to keep ourselves motivated, heading towards the goal, when we have so little time for our real “loved ones”, so little time for ourselves, and to develop our personal lives.

This is a serious issue that is often unconsidered by the left. But more over today those of us who have invested years to the cause of stopping climate change are at risk of demoralisation, depression, exhaustion, and alienation. For me this has been a confronting reality as I have struggled with depression for the better part of 2012 and have undertaken to see a psychologist. I suspect there are others out there in a similar state of mind.

There is an idea that well sums up the reality of our task as climate activists “combining pessimism of the intellect with optimism of the will”. Unfortunately getting the balance right is no easy task, nor will that balance be achieved accidentally. Read more

  1. [1] Che Guevara, Man and Socialism, 1965

Common Threads – February 2013

  • Could there ever be a corporate Common Cause? Adam Corner asks if the private sector shouldn’t start thinking about developing and investing in some common strategies for sustainability. As Tom Crompton has said, “The marketing industry has a particular responsibility to examine the impact of its activities on cultural values [but] a company’s management culture, the incentives it offers its employees, and its contribution to public priorities through the lobbying activities of its trade associations, are all likely to have crucial impacts on cultural values.” And on a related note, join the debate about ‘Goodvertising’ here.
  • Values and the Sharing Economy – good piece.
  • The virtues of a four-day week – we could do with a big campaign on this…
  • Non-cures for real life problems: questionable techniques for women’s ‘empowerment’.
  • This Space Available reclaiming cities and other spaces from the onslaught of the visual pollution of advertising.
  • The limits of data – “Data obscures values. I recently saw an academic book with the excellent title, Raw Data’ Is an Oxymoron. One of the points was that data is never raw; it’s always structured according to somebody’s predispositions and values. The end result looks disinterested, but, in reality, there are value choices all the way through, from construction to interpretation.”
  • For the geeks, we give you Common Cause for Dungeons and Dragons.

Money talks: the impact of economic framing on how we act and feel

We’re ‘consumers’ or ‘taxpayers’ and we care about things like ‘pay-off’, ‘return on investment’ and ‘growth’: that’s the bottom line. Right?

Well, I’d put my money on it.

But, actually, when did that happen? When did we start to pepper our meetings, our work, and even dinner conversations with such words and phrases? Sometimes, our use of economic framing has an obvious trigger; take ‘credit crunch’. In one of the recent economic crises, journalists repeatedly used it (with a straight face), and then before you knew it, the 2008 edition of the Oxford English Dictionary carried a new definition of the word ‘crunch’, as meaning “a severe shortage of money or credit”. It was always pretty difficult to pass that particular term casually into everyday conversation, but now we officially associate crunch with economic recession, as well as biscuits.

Economic frames easily creep into everyday language via news media, or advertising, or political rhetoric, but we have little awareness of the effect that might have on the way that we think and behave. Psychological research is finally shedding light on this.

bride and groom

Read more

Values and the Sharing Economy

Rajesh Makwana came to one of our workshops in January and kindly allowed us to repost this article, originally published at Shareable.

We are all painfully familiar with the plethora of statistics that illustrate how unsustainable modern lifestyles have become and how humanity is already consuming natural resources far faster than the planet can produce or renew them. In a bid to reverse these trends, increasing numbers of people are attempting to consume less, reduce waste and recycle more regularly.  The rapid growth of the sharing economy over recent years reflects this growing environmental awareness and commitment to changing unsustainable patterns of consumption. The possibilities for sharing are already endless in many parts of the world, in everything from cars and drills to skills and knowledge. The sharing economy is undeniably taking off – and rightly so.

But can sharing the things we own as individuals really address the environmental threats facing Planet Earth? To some extent the answer is likely to depend on which resources are being shared and how many people are sharing them. However, given the urgent sustainability challenges we face – from climate change to deforestation and resource depletion – it seems unlikely that even well-developed systems of collaborative consumption will, on their own, constitute a sufficient response.

Share, Unite, Cooperate from Share The World’s Resources on Vimeo. Read more

Grassroots campaigning at MIND

Grassroots campaigning at MIND

One year ago, I signed up for the Common Cause ‘Action Learning Process’ and started a journey with a group of campaigners from across the charity sector. Although we were all working on different issues (disability, international development, climate change) we shared a hunger for new ideas on how to campaign in a way that could reach out to more people and achieve fundamental changes in society.

Some initial reading around the theory of values and frames had enticed me in, but I was unsure of what to expect from the course. Although this theory provided the backbone of what followed, it was the process itself, and the people I shared it with that really stuck with me. Read more

Common Threads – January 2013

  • CCTV increases people’s sense of anxiety – “High levels of security have come to characterise our public buildings. This is because security has become a prerequisite of planning permission as a result of [Secured by Design], which is a design policy that has the blessing of the police.” It seems that “while people often believed CCTV would make them feel safer, the opposite turned out to be the case.”
  • Jonathan Franzen on consumerism, materialism and commodification – “To speak more generally, the ultimate goal of technology, the telos of techne, is to replace a natural world that’s indifferent to our wishes — a world of hurricanes and hardships and breakable hearts, a world of resistance — with a world so responsive to our wishes as to be, effectively, a mere extension of the self. Let me suggest, finally, that the world of techno-consumerism is therefore troubled by real love, and that it has no choice but to trouble love in turn.”
  • Article by Georgie Fienberg in BBC Viewpoint magazine, arguing that  development charities should move away from using guilt, shock and pity in their appeals. “This type of fundraising is antiquated, delivers the wrong message and is actually a net negative for society at large – both for Western societies and those in developing countries. I want to see poverty shock advertising consigned to the history book…”
  • A recent poll from the Associated Press-GfK finds that American concern for global warming is slowly creeping up, but most notably through direct experience rather than scientific communication.
  • Philosopher Roman Krznaric talks about moving away from introspection into ‘empathic outrospection’. Here, with the help of RSA animate, he makes the case for cultivating shared emotional responses as a vehicle for wider social and political change.
  • A Greenpeace campaign video that highlights the environmental damage caused by fashion companies while supporting a broader critique of consumerism. We like.

Satirising the sell off: creative campaigning through intrinsic means

SOLD

On Thursday the 6th December 2012, as part of Oxfam’s weekend of action on the land campaign, we co-organised a well attended auction in Bristol city centre.

The auction wasn’t selling antiques, vehicles or even animals, but Bristol’s very own landscapes, neighbourhoods and monuments. Staff from Grab, Grab & Profit auction house went to town, selling off Clifton Suspension Bridge, Bristol Temple Meads Train Station, Easton, St Pauls, nearby trees and even people. Grab, Grab & Profit wanted to promote private investment by selling off parts of Bristol to competitive corporate bidders at exceptionally attractive rates.

While some members of the public attempted to take part in the land rush, many others objected to the blatant injustice taking place, and put their name to supporting the land campaign. The Land Campaign calls for the world bank to enforce a 6 month freeze on all large scale land investments, and then review the process by which these purchases are conducted. More information on the land campaign, calling for an end to unjust land grabs here. Read more

Common Cause Introductory Workshop

London, January 25th 10-4.30pm

Read more

Stepping Back to Think

Interviews with people at the Common Cause Lunch in Brussels

In Brussels, we try to meet regularly to discuss theory and practice of values and frames during lunchtime. On 21 November, we had the pleasure to welcome Rich Hawkins from PIRC in the European capital. Over the past few months, many more people showed interest in Common Cause, so this was an opportunity for us to refresh our knowledge about the use of values and frames and to introduce new comers to the concept. Individuals from ActionAid and Cooperatives Europe shared their impressions: Read more

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