February 4, 2014No Comments

Communication is Conservation

I was told an inspiring story by a colleague from a conservation organisation involved in the Common Cause for Nature project recently and thought that was worth sharing.

He said to me that for as long as he had been in the press team he had often regretted not doing a more practical degree so that he could have done proper “on the ground” conservation. However, since his involvement in the Common Cause for Nature project, his increased understanding of psychology meant he could see that his work was conservation - he now understood that communication is conservation.

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The Common Cause for Nature report shows that both experiences and communications are important in influencing people’s motivation and therefore key to achieving a future better for wildlife. In other words, communication is an important component in delivering wider public support for conservation.

In the report we recommend the following with regard to communications:

WHEN COMMUNICATING:

DO

  • Talk more about how amazing nature is and use inspiring pictures to reinforce this
  • Talk about caring for other people
  • Give members and supporters active roles  - encourage them do their own thing and be creative
  • Be clear about both what the problems are and what solutions are needed
  • Make solutions proportionate to the problem, if the ask is something small show how it relates to the bigger change needed.

DON’T

  • Overemphasize threat - threat is important in raising awareness but over using it can make people feel helpless
  • Ignore the problems or the solutions - both are needed to make it clear why action is important
  • Appeal to the desire for power and money
  • Don’t appeal to conflicting values at the same time - avoid using intrinsic and extrinsic values together
  • Portray your organisation as a lone superhero - we cannot succeed on our own, messages should emphasize how members and supporters are part of the solution.

Although incredibly important, communication is only one thread. We need to bring an understanding of values into all areas of conservation work. The report outlines recommendations for other work areas as well as ways in which organisations themselves can adopt working practices to strengthen their own values.

Read the full report here to find out more.

October 22, 2013No Comments

The Real Value of Water

The Common Cause for Nature report highlights the importance of the conservation sector engaging with other actors with a firm understanding of the values implications of that engagement. In this guest post, Rob Cunningham head of Water Policy at the RSPB discusses these issues in regard to the water industry.

When I mentioned the work of Common Cause at a recent water industry conference I felt a momentary pang of guilt – should I really be pointing these servants of mammon to such valuable insights into our motivations and psyche? What if they use it against us?

And there are reasons to be worried. Recent reports and headlines have shed light on dubious tax arrangements, huge payouts and opaque foreign ownership. Such behaviour draws uncomfortable comparison with Google, Amazon and Starbucks.

But there is one fundamental difference. Read more

September 30, 20131 Comment

Give & Live – just don’t confuse the two!

I hover my mouse over the two photos; should I go for the Qualcast or the Flymo? I click on the Qualcast and add it to my basket. The Flymo was called an 'easi-glide' and I refuse to promote illiteracy through my purchasing decisions. At least Qualcast have had the decency to add a U when using the letter Q.

I have just bought a lawn mower from Argos and donated 50 quid to Cancer Research all in one click of a button; isn’t the modern world amazing?!

Okay, I haven’t: that was just artistic licence. I don’t need a mower; I have guinea pigs. But I could have, if I was signed up to ‘Give as you Live’.

Give As You Live

Give as you Live: Help your favourite cause just by shopping online.

The scheme allows people to contribute to charities whenever they buy things online. On the surface it seems like a great idea. I'm going to spend the money anyway, so why not give to charity while I do so? What could the harm be? Read more

August 30, 2013No Comments

People for Ecosystem Services: Rethinking market solutions for sustainable farming practice

I have just been reading Jay Griffith’s latest book ‘Kith’, in which she urges us not to lose sight of our relationship with nature and our connectedness with the earth:

“Land can make someone who they are, can create their psyche, giving them fragments of themselves… shatter the relation to the land and you can shatter personalities”

Common Cause for Nature (CCfN) brings the same plea centre stage as a means to guide the conservation sector in their task of championing, protecting and restoring the environment that is our home. Demonstrating the importance of nurturing intrinsic values, which foster care for others of every species, ‘Common Cause…’ provides an important caution against the ever increasing reliance we now place in economic value and market solutions. Read more

August 16, 20132 Comments

Common Cause for Nature: A call to collaborate

This is a guest post by Jon Alexander of the National Trust.

The lessons for the conservation movement held within Common Cause for Nature are deep and many. But I would argue the most important is the simplest of all, and comes before you get beyond the cover. It is the title – Common Cause for Nature. This is a call to arms to all of us who work in this space not just to work and campaign separately on our own specific ‘bits’, but far more importantly, to get beyond those bits and work together to create a proactive, persuasive, powerful whole. Read more

©2018 - 2019 Common Cause Foundation

©2018 - 2019 Common Cause Foundation

©2018 - 2019 Common Cause Foundation

©2018 - 2019 Common Cause Foundation

©2018 - 2019 Common Cause Foundation

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